I am the Queen of Awesome. My words do not represent my employer, but I bet you already knew that.
16776 stories
·
35 followers

Hulu is raising price of its live TV service to $55 a month

1 Comment
Hulu

Hulu will increase the price of its Hulu with Live TV service by 20 percent on December 18th, setting the new subscription rate at $54.99 a month, up from $44.99.

Both new and existing customers will be affected by the increase. New subscribers as of December 18th will be served the $55-a-month price tag, while existing subscribers will see the changes in their following bill cycle. This is the second time Hulu has increased the price for the bundle in less than a year; it previously increased the package from $40 to $45 a month in January. A blog post published by the company today acknowledges that “price changes are never easy to stomach.”

“We know that many people don’t watch live television year-round, so we’ve made it easy for Hulu subscribers to switch back and forth between our plans to best suit their needs,” the blog post reads.

Competition in the live TV space is getting tougher. Sony announced at the end of October that it was shutting down its PlayStation Vue service, in part because “the highly competitive Pay TV industry, with expensive content and network deals, has been slower to change than we expected.” Other services, including YouTube TV and AT&T TV Now (formerly DirecTV Now), have also increased their prices to compete. YouTube TV raised its prices in April to $50 a month, while AT&T TV Now jumped twice this year. The basic cost of AT&T TV Now is $65 a month, instead of $50.

Hulu is “actively exploring ways to provide additional, more tailored live TV options to you in the future,” according to the blog post. The goal is to give customers “even more choice and control over their live viewing experience.” That sounds like Hulu is exploring smaller bundle options (instead of the 60-plus channels customers currently get) and possibly at a lower cost.

Giving customers fewer channels is a facet of the industry going forward that Bob Iger, CEO of Disney, Hulu’s parent company, sees as likely. Iger told investors during the company’s most recent earnings call, “I happen to believe long-term that people will be interested in less channels.”

“It doesn’t mean that they don’t subscribe at all to multichannel services,” Iger said. “But I think the trend will be in the direction of fewer channels rather than as many, or certainly more.”

The news comes just a few days after Disney launched its crown jewel streaming service, Disney+. The streaming service is available for $6.99 a month or as a bundle with ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for $12.99 a month.

Read the whole story
angelchrys
2 days ago
reply
And at that price, you might as well go back to cable. Sheesh.
Overland Park, KS
tingham
2 days ago
Adding the live service ip locks your account; they just took the entirely wrong approach with this thing
angelchrys
2 days ago
It's like they set out to make it as shitty as possible
tingham
2 days ago
yup
Share this story
Delete

What Can Americans Learn from Germany’s Reckoning with the Holocaust?

1 Share

For The New Republic, Heather Souvaine Horn reviews Susan Neiman’s book, Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil, about the successes and failures of Germany in coming to terms with the Holocaust and what the United States can learn from them in dealing with our history of slavery and genocide.

She sees the murder of nine black Charleston churchgoers in 2015, and the events of the following years, as prime examples of conservative backlash in white communities: “The 2016 election resulted, in large part,” Neiman writes, “from America’s failure to confront its own history.” Her book, Learning From the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil, offers a possible answer to one of the questions The New York Times’ 1619 Project, published in the same month and focusing on slavery’s centrality to the American nation, has prompted: What now? It is a book about how Americans could better confront their racist past, by looking at the way Germany has come to terms with Holocaust guilt.

After a trip to Berlin last year, I wrote about what I observed of the German remembrance of the Holocaust and its relevance to America:

With overt anti-Semitism growing in the US (as well as other things like the current administration’s policies on immigration and jailing of children in concentration camps), it’s instructive to compare the German remembrance of the Holocaust to America’s relative lack of public introspection & remembrance about its dark history.

In particular, as a nation the US has never properly come to terms with the horrors it inflicted on African Americans and Native Americans. We build monuments to Confederate soldiers but very few to the millions enslaved and murdered. Our country committed genocide against native peoples, herded them onto reservations like cattle, and we’re still denying them the right to vote.

You might think the Civil War & the oppression of African Americans is too far in the past for the US to truly reckon with it, but Neiman argues that we should be looking much closer to the present day:

But this, Neiman holds, is the wrong timeline to be looking at: Americans are only now in the early stages of their reckoning, for the simple fact that the Civil War did not really end in 1865. Due to Reconstruction, due to Jim Crow, and as evidenced by the appalling violence and state-federal standoffs of the 1960s, the appropriate point to mark the South’s “zero hour,” she believes, is not 1865 but 1964, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act. According to this timeline, Americans are a bit behind the Germans, but not by much — “about the place where Germany was when the Wehrmacht Exhibit provoked the kind of backlash that the removal of Confederate monuments provoked in New Orleans.”

Plus, systemic discrimination continues to this day, as does the US government’s poor treatment of indigenous communities. There is plenty of reckoning to go around and no time like the present to begin.

Tags: books   genocide   Germany   Heather Souvaine Horn   Holocaust   Learning from the Germans   racism   Susan Neiman   WWII
Read the whole story
angelchrys
2 days ago
reply
Overland Park, KS
Share this story
Delete

Review: Hello Kitty Kruisers - If Your Age Is In The Double Digits, This Is Best Avoided

1 Comment

So easy an actual cat could play it.

It’s odd what passes for rare these days. Take Hello KItty Kruisers, for example; released physically on the Wii U in limited numbers, it can be bought on the Wii U eShop for a mere ten bucks and yet the boxed version regularly sells to collectors for upwards of $60 online.

Thankfully, the game has now meandered over to the Switch eShop too, so you can now easily buy it here if you’re craving your fix of Sanrio-themed racing goodness. Not that you should be, when you consider that what we have here is actually a fairly rubbish game.

Read the full article on nintendolife.com



Read the whole story
angelchrys
2 days ago
reply
I have most unfortunately never found a good Hello Kitty game. It's like Sanrio is allergic to partnering with competent game devs.
Overland Park, KS
Share this story
Delete

Lin-Manuel Miranda on The Role of the Artist in the Age of Trump

1 Share

In The Role of the Artist in the Age of Trump, playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda reflects on how truth inherent in art means that “all art is political”.

At the end of the day, our job as artists is to tell the truth as we see it. If telling the truth is an inherently political act, so be it. Times may change and politics may change, but if we do our best to tell the truth as specifically as possible, time will reveal those truths and reverberate beyond the era in which we created them. We keep revisiting Shakespeare’s Macbeth because ruthless political ambition does not belong to any particular era. We keep listening to Public Enemy because systemic racism continues to rain tragedy on communities of color. We read Orwell’s 1984 and shiver at its diagnosis of doublethink, which we see coming out of the White House at this moment.

In a 1969 piece, Kurt Vonnegut asserted that art is an early warning system for society:

I sometimes wondered what the use of any of the arts was. The best thing I could come up with was what I call the canary in the coal mine theory of the arts. This theory says that artists are useful to society because they are so sensitive. They are super-sensitive. They keel over like canaries in poison coal mines long before more robust types realize that there is any danger whatsoever.

While not specifically about art, here’s a bit of what I wrote in a January 2017 post, How to Productive in Terrible Times.

I’ve always had difficulty believing that the work I do here is in some way important to the world and since the election, that feeling has blossomed into a profound guilt-ridden anxiety monster. I mean, who in the actual fuck cares about the new Blade Runner movie or how stamps are designed (or Jesus, the blurry ham) when our government is poised for a turn towards corruption and authoritarianism?

I have come up with some reasons why my work here does matter, at least to me, but I’m not sure they’re good ones. In the meantime, I’m pressing on because my family and I rely on my efforts here and because I hope that in some small way my work, as Webb writes, “is capable of enabling righteous acts”.

Tags: art   Kurt Vonnegut   Lin-Manuel Miranda   politics   working
Read the whole story
angelchrys
3 days ago
reply
Overland Park, KS
Share this story
Delete

PayPal drops payments to Pornhub performers

1 Comment
according to Pornhub, their reversal will affect the livelihoods of over 100k people
Read the whole story
angelchrys
3 days ago
reply
Not cool, PayPal
Overland Park, KS
Share this story
Delete

Brooklyn Nine-Nine Snags Very Early Season 8 Renewal at NBC

1 Share
Brooklyn Nine-Nine has copped a very early renewal at NBC, with the network commissioning an eighth season of the Andy Samberg comedy three months ahead of the series’ Season 7 launch. Per NBC, Brooklyn Nine-Nine‘s sixth season averaged a 1.2 rating and 3.2 million viewers (live-plus same day) — a double digit uptick vs. the […]



Read the whole story
angelchrys
3 days ago
reply
Overland Park, KS
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories