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Roe v. Wade has been overturned. In these states, abortion access will no longer be accessible.

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The Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the landmark case that had guaranteed the right to an abortion since 1973. States now have the right to ban or otherwise heavily restrict abortion if it is not protected by their state constitutions. In some states, the impact will be felt immediately. In others, legal questions about the future of abortion access could drag out for years. 

The decision to overturn Roe, issued Friday in the case known as Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, had been expected since May, when a draft version of the decision was leaked to Politico.

The ruling’s impact will vary from state to state. But it will without doubt create a patchwork system where abortion is illegal in large swaths of the country. Here, The 19th explains what will happen next in states across the country. 

Which states have trigger laws? And how long will it take for those to go into effect?

Currently, 13 states have trigger laws, bans written to prohibit abortion that would take effect once Roe is overturned. While the mechanisms and timing of these bans vary, they are certain to soon eliminate access to legal abortion in large swaths of the country.

Trigger laws appear to take effect immediately in three states: Kentucky, Louisiana and South Dakota. 

Five other states require their attorneys general to certify the Supreme Court decision before they can begin enforcement: Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and Oklahoma. For months, attorney general offices in those states had been preparing to move swiftly to enforce those bans — and the unequivocal writing in the court’s decision makes quick action all the more likely. 

In Utah, an independent legislative council must do a similar certification; in Wyoming, the governor plays that role. 

In three other states — Idaho, Tennessee and Texas — abortion bans will take effect in 30 days. (In Oklahoma and Texas, abortions are already not available for people who are past six weeks pregnant.) Only four of these states — Idaho, North Dakota, Mississippi and Wyoming — have exceptions in their laws for rape. 

Abortion rights activists march outside of the Austin Convention Center.
Abortion rights activists march outside of the Austin Convention Center in May 2022. (Brandon Bell/Getty Images)

What about abortion bans that were on the books before Roe?

Michigan, Alabama, Arizona, West Virginia and Wisconsin do not have trigger laws, but they do all have abortion bans on the books that pre-date the 1973 Roe decision and were never repealed. Georgia has a pre-Roe ban that was partially struck down by the Supreme Court in 1973, in another case separate from Roe. 

These laws could be newly enforced, but legal questions loom, and they are certain to be the subject of months or even years of litigation. There is little precedent for enforcing laws that have long been blocked, and experts are divided as to whether these bans can now take effect, or if they would need to be passed through state legislatures once again. Michigan’s pre-Roe ban is already facing two legal challenges, and a state judge has temporarily blocked the law from being enforced. In Arizona, Republican Gov. Doug Ducey has indicated he does not believe the state’s ban would be enforceable, but other state lawmakers have argued that it should indeed take effect. 

The question marks surrounding what is legal and what is not in those states will certainly foster confusion and uncertainty for clinicians who provide abortions, as well as patients. Even in states with governors or attorneys general disinclined to enforce these bans, legal experts have noted, individual prosecutors or law enforcement officials could attempt to leverage them to criminalize people providing abortions. That means that, even if these bans are ultimately not enforced, the risk of criminal prosecution is likely to deter people from seeking or providing abortions, physicians and reproductive health advocates worry.

What about other abortion restrictions that aren’t total bans?

The arrival of the Roe decision means other states are likely to push further restrictions on abortion that would have been unconstitutional under Roe v. Wade. Georgia, Ohio and South Carolina have all passed six-week abortion bans that were blocked by federal courts; in all three states, the governors have indicated they will seek to have those bans enforced. If that occurred, Florida and North Carolina would be the only states in the southeast to allow abortion past six weeks. Florida’s 15-week ban, which has been challenged in the state court, is currently set to take effect July 1.

Most state legislatures have ended their work for the year. But attorneys and government officials in some states have been preparing to unearth old abortion restrictions that were previously blocked by courts. Now that Roe is overturned, they could reopen those cases to further restrict access. 

“If you’ve already got those laws that have been passed through the legislative process, why not seek to enforce them without having to come back?” Katie Glenn, government affairs counsel for the anti-abortion lobbying group Americans United Life, told The 19th previously.

A woman holds a sign that reads "Forced Pregnancy is a Crime Against Humanity" as she protests in front of the Supreme Court.
Abortion rights activists attend a rally in front of the Supreme Court building On May 5, 2022 in Washington, D.C. (Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

Ohio, where the legislature is still in session, was working to pass its own trigger law. And in South Carolina, the Senate has begun the process of calling back its legislature for a special session to approve new abortion bans. If the House agrees to come back into session, they could work to pass a full abortion ban this summer. In Nebraska, lawmakers have been putting pressure on their governors to call the legislatures back to pass new abortion bans. The Indiana governor has agreed to call a special session in July to address inflation, and lawmakers may add abortion bans to their agenda as well.

And in Florida, whose 15-week ban passed earlier this year, some abortion rights opponents are calling on Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis to bring the legislature back to pass new restrictions as well. Even if that does not happen this summer, Glenn said, Florida — along with Montana, Iowa and Kansas — is a likely target for abortion restrictions in the years to come. 

Which states protect the right to abortion? 

In 10 states, the state’s supreme court has found that its constitution guarantees the right to an abortion. Vermont is voting on a constitutional amendment later this year that would explicitly protect abortion rights. Voters in Arizona and Michigan may weigh in on similar amendments as well. 

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • California
  • Florida
  • Kansas
  • Massachusetts
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico

In some states, though, existing protections are tenuous. In Kansas, voters will weigh in on an amendment to the state constitutions eliminating that protection. Similar amendments are on the ballot in Kentucky and Oklahoma. Florida, where the court has shifted to the right under DeSantis, is expected to soon eliminate its own state abortion rights guarantee. Iowa’s Supreme Court recognized the right to an abortion up until this month; on June 17, it issued a new ruling eliminating that protection.

Beyond constitutional rights, a dozen states have passed laws codifying the right to an abortion up until the fetus can live independently outside the womb.

  • California
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Nevada
  • New York
  • Rhode Island
  • Washington

Four other states plus the District of Columbia have passed laws that protect abortion rights throughout pregnancy. (Because D.C. is not a state, some local officials are concerned that a Republican-controlled Congress could attempt to ban abortion in the capital.)

  • Colorado
  • New Jersey
  • Oregon
  • Vermont

The post Roe v. Wade has been overturned. In these states, abortion access will no longer be accessible. appeared first on The 19th.

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angelchrys
3 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
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Neil Gaiman's Journal: The Neil story (with additional footnote)

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(I wrote this on Tumblr. It's since been picked up and quoted all over the place, and I'm being asked a lot if it's actually something I said, and if it's true. It is, and it is. Here's the original.)

duckswearhats asked: Hi, I read that you've dealt with with impostor syndrome in the past, and I'm really struggling with that right now. I'm in a good place and my friends are going through a lot, and I'm struggling to justify my success to myself when such amazing people are unhappy. I was wondering if you have any tips to feel less like this and maybe be kinder to myself, but without hurting anyone around me. It's a big ask, I know, but any help would make my life a lot less stressful 

The best help I can offer is to point you to Amy Cuddy’s book, Presence. She talks about Imposter Syndrome (and interviews me in it) and offers helpful insight.

The second best help might be in the form of an anecdote. Some years ago, I was lucky enough invited to a gathering of great and good people: artists and scientists, writers and discoverers of things.  And I felt that at any moment they would realise that I didn’t qualify to be there, among these people who had really done things. On my second or third night there, I was standing at the back of the hall, while a musical entertainment happened, and I started talking to a very nice, polite, elderly gentleman about several things, including our shared first name*. And then he pointed to the hall of people, and said words to the effect of, “I just look at all these people, and I think, what the heck am I doing here? They’ve made amazing things. I just went where I was sent.” And I said, “Yes. But you were the first man on the moon. I think that counts for something.” And I felt a bit better. Because if Neil Armstrong felt like an imposter, maybe everyone did. Maybe there weren’t any grown-ups, only people who had worked hard and also got lucky and were slightly out of their depth, all of us doing the best job we could, which is all we can really hope for.

 (There’s a wonderful photograph of the Three Neils even if one of us was a Neal at http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2012/08/neil-armstrong.html)

...

*(I remember being amused and flattered that he knew who I was, not because he'd read anything by me, but because the Google algorithm of the time had me down as Neil #1. If you just typed Neil, it would take you to <a href="http://neilgaiman.com" rel="nofollow">neilgaiman.com</a>. Many people, including me, felt that if there was a Neil #1, it was most definitely him.)

Labels: Imposter Syndrome, Neil Armstrong

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acdha
4 days ago
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“I think that counts for something.”
Washington, DC
angelchrys
4 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
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Elon Musk’s daughter says she is trans and wants nothing to do with her father

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Elon Musk’s daughter has reportedly filed for a name change, explaining that she is trans and no longer wants a relationship with her father.

The Tesla tycoon’s daughter from his first marriage to Justine Wilson has filed a petition to change her name, citing that she does not “wish to be related to my biological father in any way, shape or form”.

The daughter, who just turned 18, also petitioned for a new birth certificate with a female gender marker at the Los Angeles County Superior Court in April, according to Reuters.

The Daily Beast reported that Musk replied to its request for comment ahead of the news of Wilson’s name change being made public, stating: “She does not want to be a public figure. I think it is important to defend her right to privacy.

“Please don’t out someone against their will – it’s not right.”

The story has since been been reported globally.

Musk has previously been criticised for making anti-trans statements, including tweeting “pronouns suck” and “pronouns are an aesthetic nightmare” in 2020.

Most recently, Musk mocked tech brands for changing their logos to mark Pride Month.

The billionaire posted a meme to Twitter of an approaching storm swirling with brand logos in rainbow colours, with the words “June is almost here” on 31 May.

The logos included those of Facebook, Google, Spotify and Twitter, the company Musk is attempting to buy for $44 billion.

In light of Musk’s attempt to buy Twitter, after he said he would prioritise “free speech” on the platform, GLAAD president Sarah Ellis said: “LGBTQ people are at disproportionate risk for harassment online and violence in real life.

“The cost of hate speech further erodes basic safety and civility across society.”

The post Elon Musk’s daughter says she is trans and wants nothing to do with her father appeared first on PinkNews | Latest lesbian, gay, bi and trans news | LGBTQ+ news.

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angelchrys
6 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
deezil
6 days ago
He names a kid X with Grimes, but this is a bridge too far? He's such an unrepentant shit lord and it's annoying.
angelchrys
6 days ago
It is AMAZING how much he sucks and yet doesn't seem to care.
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@msolurin: With Juneteenth approaching, it’s a good time to discuss change. It’s not hyperbole to say the prison industrial complex is modern day slavery. The 13th amendment abolished slavery and involuntary servitude EXCEPT for those convicted of a crime. It’s time to end the exception

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angelchrys
6 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
rocketo
7 days ago
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seattle, wa
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1 public comment
sarcozona
7 days ago
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If you’re fussed about immigration pushing down wages, you should be losing your mind about slave labor in the US
Epiphyte City

Baseball legend and inspiration for A League of Their Own comes out as gay, aged 95

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Maybelle Blair, one of the inspirations behind the iconic film A League of Their Own, has come out publicly at 95 years old. 

Blair was among the original players in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL), a professional women’s baseball league which existed from 1943 to 1954. The league represents a unique aspect of the US’ baseball history and was a forerunner of women’s professional league sports in the country.

The AAGPBL also served as the inspiration for the 1992 comedy-drama film A League of Their Own which starred Tom Hanks, Geena Davis, Madonna, Lori Petty and Rosie O’Donnell. 

Blair, who was a pitcher for the AAGPBL’s Peoria Redwings, came out as a lesbian for “basically the first time” during a panel for a new Amazon Prime series based on the baseball league. 

The AAGPBL legend expressed her happiness that young players no longer have to hide their sexuality and can live as their authentic selves while playing the sport they love. 

“I think it’s a great opportunity for these young girl ball players to come [to] realise that they’re not alone, and you don’t have to hide,” she said. “I hid for 75, 85 years, and this is actually basically the first time I’ve ever come out.”

Blair added that she thought she was the “only one [gay person] in the world” and thought there was something “wrong” with her because she had a “crush” on a girl in high school.

“We sort of had a little thing, you know how you do,” Blair said. “I was with a girl. It was really bad because in our day you wouldn’t dare tell your family or hint anybody…”

A League of Their Own is a fictionalised retelling of the AAGPBL’s formation as a way to keep baseball in the public eye in the wake of World War II. During the war efforts, many professional male players were drafted into the war, essentially shutting down Major League Baseball. 

Over 600 women played in the AAGPBL which eventually consisted of 10 professional baseball teams across the American midwest. In 1948, the attendance of spectators at league games peaked at over 910,000, according to the AAGPBL’s website

The 1992 film followed competitive sisters Dorothy “Dottie” Hinson (Davis) and Kit Keller (Petty) join the Rockford Peaches, which is part of the first female professional baseball league, and struggle to help it succeed amidst their intense rivalry. 

Both the 1992 film and the Amazon Prime show, also titled A League of Their Own, take place in 1943 at the inception of the AAGPBL. But the Amazon version will follow a different team than the one depicted in the film, and thus have a different storyline. 

Amazon’s A League of Their Own stars Abbi Jacobson, Chanté Adams, D’Arcy Carden, Roberta Colindrez, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Kelly McCormack and Priscilla Delgado. Nick Offerman will play the new team’s manager. 

The show A League of Their Own will debut on Amazon Prime on 12 August. 

 

The post Baseball legend and inspiration for A League of Their Own comes out as gay, aged 95 appeared first on PinkNews | Latest lesbian, gay, bi and trans news | LGBTQ+ news.

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angelchrys
10 days ago
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Fire Emblem And Pokémon Voice Actor Billy Kametz Has Passed Away

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The voice of many anime and video game characters.

There's some very sad news coming out of the voice acting industry today. Billy Kametz has passed away at 35 years of age after a battle with stage four colon cancer.

Read the full article on nintendolife.com



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angelchrys
15 days ago
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He was also Galo in the English dub of Promare 😭
Overland Park, KS
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